10 great photography quotes from Henri Cartier Bresson

Henri Cartier Bresson is considered one of the most famous photographers of all time. He is known for his Decisive Moment and tight compositions. Along with Robert Capa, he founded the Magnum Photography agency. Here's 10 great photography quotes from him.

 

Sharpness is a bourgeois concept

– Henri Cartier Bresson

 

Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst

– Henri Cartier Bresson

 

The picture is good or not from the moment it was caught in the camera

– Henri Cartier Bresson

 

While we’re working, we must be conscious of what we’re doing

– Henri Cartier Bresson

 

We must avoid however, snapping away, shooting quickly and without thought, overloading ourselves with unnecessary images that clutter our memory and diminish the clarity of the whole

– Henri Cartier Bresson

 

Of course it’s all luck.

– Henri Cartier-Bresson

 

As far as I am concerned, taking photographs is a means of understanding which cannot be separated from other means of visual expression. It is a way of shouting, of freeing oneself, not of proving or asserting one’s own originality. It is a way of life.

– Henri Cartier Bresson

 

You just have to live and life will give you pictures.

– Henri Cartier Bresson

 

During the work, you have to be sure that you haven't left any holes, that you've captured everything, because afterwards it will be too late.

– Henri Cartier Bresson

 

Think about the photo before and after, never during. The secret is to take your time. You mustn’t go too fast. The subject must forget about you. Then, however, you must be very quick.

– Henri Cartier Bresson

 

Photography has not changed since its origin except in its technical aspects, which for me are not important.

– Henri Cartier Bresson

 

What reinforces the content of a photograph is the sense of rhythm – the relationship between shapes and values.

– Henri Cartier Bresson

 

Photography is nothing–it's life that interests me.

– Henri Cartier Bresson

 

…it is seldom indeed that a composition which was poor when the picture was taken can be improved by reshaping it in the dark room.

– Henri Cartier Bresson